Suddenly It’s Cool to Bash Barack

From the Telegraph:

Bemoaning Obama’s passivity after the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, the director Spike Lee thundered: “He’s very calm, cool, collected. But, one time, go off! If there’s any one time to go off, this is it, because this is a disaster.”

This is the same Spike Lee who once described Obama’s election as a “seismic” change that represented “a better day not only for the United States but for the world”.

[…]

Even the liberal chattering classes are deserting Obama. Maureen Dowd of theNew York Times jeered that his “Yes we can” slogan had been downgraded to “Will we ever?”, while fellow colunnist Frank Rich blasted his “recurrent tardiness in defining exactly what he wants done”.

[…]

Perhaps Obama’s toughest critic over the BP oil slick has been James “Rajin’ Cajun” Carville, the mastermind of Bill Clinton’s 1992 presidential campaign and one of those Democrats who represents the beating heart of the party. He blasted Obama’s “political stupidity” and “hands off” attitude, concluding: “It seems the President is madder at his critics than he is at BP.”

His point was proved when Robert Gibbs, Obama’s hyper-aggressive spokesman, responded: “I don’t think James understands all of what we’re doing. I don’t think James understood the facts.” Carville is a Louisiana native who had spent more time viewing the oil-soaked coastal wetlands than anyone in the White House.

The Carville criticism seems to me to be the weightiest; this is a man who embodies the white southern liberalness of the party, a guy who helped make history with Dick Morris, Bill Clinton, and “triangulation.” He’ll still be a viable part of the party long after the current administration rides their low approval ratings out of office.