Friday Reading

Oregon hustles a 7-year-old and her lemonade stand

Kawaguchi, who oversees the two county inspectors involved, said they must be fair and consistent in their monitoring, no matter the age of the person. “Our role is to protect the public,” he said.

[…]

“It’s gotten to the point where they need to be in all of our decisions. They don’t trust us to make good choices on our own.”

Government goes after blogger’s free speech

DC plays games with Texas. Who doesn’t know “don’t mess with Texas?!”

Advertisements

Weekend Reading

The Obama Donor List:

As a confidential source for the New York Times, I turned this document over to reporter Stephanie Strom months before the 2008 presidential elections and though the list includes information more complete than what the Obama campaign turned over to the Federal Election Commission, the NYT decided to bury the story.

Newspaper chain’s business plan: abuse copyright to raise capital (h/t Caleb)

What happened to all kids being covered? Yet another “unintended consequence” of Obama’s health control:

Some major health insurance companies have stopped issuing certain types of policies for children, an unintended consequence of President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul law, state officials said Friday.

– (Reading … or listening.) My interview with Michele Bachmann:

– My interview with Laura Ingraham:

Past interviews plus other videos.

The diversity, or lack thereof, in the journolist.

CNN calls for crackdown on bloggers; plus more on how Sherrod’s video was in context.

MO GOP 1st District Candidate Calls Out NAACP

From Martin Baker:

When it was first brought to my attention that the NAACP had used their bully pulpit to condemn the Tea Party movement in one of its first acts of its national convention, branding those who associate themselves with it as racist, I laughed at the absolute duplicity of it. I asked myself, “at what point did the Tea Party movement become such a threat to the coffers of the NAACP that they felt the need to fire a broadside salvo against them?” Has what was once a historical organization that spearheaded the advancement of civil rights become a faction of jealous rage?” but most importantly I asked once question…“WHO DESIGNATED THE NAACP AS THE ARBITERS OF ALL THAT COULD BE DEEMED RACIST RATHER INDIVIDUALLY OR COLLECTIVELY?”

Gun Ban’s Racist Roots

In light of the Chicago ruling, an absolute must-read from La Shawn Barber:

The Black Codes, laws set up after the Civil War, continued to restrict the rights of newly freed slaves to own firearms, own or rent farmland, vote, sit on juries, testify against white men, sue and enter into contracts. As de facto slavery, the purpose of the Codes was to maintain the white hierarchy. Some things never die. What dies are the rights of people to protect themselves.

A Profile in True Feminism

We have people like the Daily Beast editor Tina Brown presupposing that conservatives can’t be feminists because female genocide abortion is the litmus test for whether or not a woman can be considered a conservative (denying choice to women by way of monopolizing the definition on a completely arbitrary standard? How very unfeminist!) – which makes the story of Ayaan Hirsi Ali so refreshing and truly empowering. From Big Government:

Ayaan Hirsi Ali is the author of Infidel, a deeply personal account of her disillusionment with and rejection of her Muslim upbringing, as well as her latest book Nomad, which chronicles her continuing journey. She also collaborated with late film director Theo Van Gogh on the short documentary filmSubmission, the release of which resulted in the brutal assassination of Van Gogh by a homegrown Dutch Islamic jihadist and ultimately drove her from the Netherlands because of her inability to find adequate security there. She continues to be an outspoken critic of the subjugation and mistreatment of women under fundamentalist Islam, and the AHA Foundation which she founded aims to combat “several types of crimes against women, including female genital mutilation, forced marriages, honor violence, and honor killings.”

A must-read.

Reading

Interesting read. Not sure I agree with the author’s premise entirely, considering we have a huge chunk of the population here that believe the “European way” is better. They all originated from the same varied stock as we did yet they’ve come to believe that the very government from which their ancestors considered themselves lucky to have escaped is somehow different put into the context of the 21st century.

We’re for the most part descended from the kind of individuals who possessed what historian John Steele Gordon referred to as the “get up and go” that drove them to leave the comforts of home in order to make their highly uncertain way in the new world that was the United States. We’re different because we’re descended from those who had the courage and drive to leave feudal, excessive taxing, warmongering governments. Simple as that.

When libertarian philosopher Alexis de Tocqueville traveled the U.S. in the 1830s, he described the new arrivals to the U.S. as “restless in the midst of abundance,” and as Gartner notes further, Tocqueville observed that Americans were quite nomadic then, much as we are today. Indeed, according to Gartner, the “average American changes residences every five years–more than the inhabitants of any other nation.”